Archives for posts with tag: Vacation

Happy New Year! Here are some positive thoughts to start the year right by Elise Ronan from Raising Asperger’s Kids. Elise is the mother of two children with asperger’s syndrome. She just started a parent coaching business in conjunction with her blog and we wish her good luck!

2015

“Kindness or shall we say empathy is a rather misunderstood emotion in those on the autism spectrum. There are recent studies that theorize that it’s not that autistics lack empathy or kindness, its just that they are so overwhelmed by their empathetic emotions that they need to turn it off or be consumed. So the issue then surrounding autistics is not that they don’t empathize, but that in fact empathize too much. Autistics unlike their neurotypical peers have no filter on how to protect their own emotions and their own well-being when dealing with the vagaries and cruelties of life. I know I have seen it first hand with both of my boys.

It is never that the boys don’t care. It is, without a doubt, that when they hear of a cruelty or an unkindness it takes over their souls. It is not an obsession. It is not a perseveration. It is a feeling of being lost and not understanding that they cannot solve the world’s issues on their own. They don’t seem to grasp at times that they can only do so much as an individual person. They feel that they in fact have failed.

So that is our mission with them. Not to teach them to be empathetic but to understand their limitations as human beings. To know that you can give charity, help at a food bank and feed people at a soup kitchen, but that in the end there will still be those who go to bed hungry at night, and that you as a human being did not fail. We can do so much as one person. They need to understand that our limitations makes our efforts no less important, not less heart-felt, not less perfect,  not less in the moment helpful and appreciated.

It is times like this that I try, despite CM1′ s rejection of religion, to bring up what the Talmud says about kindness, empathy and charity:

To save a single life is to have saved an entire world. 

The Rabbis knew that human beings are just that, human beings. We can do just so much in our lives. It is the effort too that counts. A single kindness, even holding open a door for the person behind you, makes this a better world. A smile, a thank you and a helping hand, to the person right in front of you says more about your life than anything else.

Meanwhile here are some past posts about the boys, empathy, kindness and charity. The entire psychology professionals who think they understand who aspergeans or autistics happen to be, who decry that those on the spectrum have any thought of others, simply need to get out a lot more and meet some of those in the autism community face to face. But that means they the so-called “Autistic Experts” would need to have empathy, understand kindness and respect people’s differences, so I am not holding my breath.”

Elise Ronan

Read the original post here

Today we are happy to share Cathy’s thoughts on parenthood and leaving your special needs child alone with his Dad! Cathy is a homemaker/wife and a mother to a 10-year old son with Autism and ADHD, an 18-year old daughter who is a college freshman and a stepson who is 30. Originally from Maryland, she has lived in the Midwest for 13 years.

Cathy guest blogger

“I recently returned this past Monday from being out of town for five days. The hubby was left in “charge” of Dominic.  I have had to leave my family before, but Lauren has always been here to “assist.” Since she is 90 miles away at college, that really wasn’t an option for her to come back and help her dad (though my sweet girl did offer). Being the ultra-detailed person that I am, I left an itinerary for the hubby to adhere to in my absence.  I showed Dominic on the calendar when I was leaving and when I was returning. His teacher and the bus driver were both made aware too. I wanted to make it as little as a disruption as possible for Dominic. The only area where the hubby saw a possible “issue” was in the bathing department. Due to Dominic’s sensory issues, he still takes a bath and I assist him about 99.9% of the time. The hubby is “banned” from bath time because about five years ago, when he tried to assist Dominic, he got a massive amount of water in Dominic’s eyes. The night before I was due to fly out, I had the hubby “sit in” and observe how I helped him to bathe. Dominic kept looking at my husband and saying, “daddy leave, daddy leave.” My husband was telling him, “well, I’m going to be helping you when mommy is gone.” As it turned out, while I was gone for those five days, the hubby helped bathe him without too much fuss. I checked in with the hubby and Dominic every day that I was gone.  Monday night, when I was coming down the escalator at the airport, I saw the hubby and Dominic before they saw me. I gave them both hugs and then we tracked down my baggage. I noticed that Dominic was wearing a shirt that looked about a size too small. Before I could comment, my husband said, “Dominic is pretty much out of clean shirts!” Okay, well I DID show the hubby how to operate the washing machine before I left 🙂 As we drove home from the airport in a blinding snowstorm, my husband told me he would get us take-out pizza for dinner. The roads were really bad, so I told him that I could make us spaghetti instead. I think about the relationship between the hubby and Dominic. My husband gets a kick out of telling people that he has a 10-year old. Most men in their early sixties, like my husband, have grandchildren that age. It warms my heart when I hear Dominic say, “daddy, blow a kiss!”  I am so glad that my “boys” did well in my absence, though I think the hubby is glad I am back in “charge” of the laundry and the bathing of Dominic!!”

Cathy B.

http://bountifulplate.blogspot.com/

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