Archives for posts with tag: Teacher

I ask the above question because life changes the best laid plans.

For us, we are officially in week two of our fall schedule. I know we could have started ours, (Elizabeth’s and mine) earlier but decided to begin at the same time as Michael, her brother.

So that brings us to week two. And I must say that what Elizabeth and I had planned on paper looks a bit different in real life. Elizabeth is home now due to COVID instead of being in her college program for those with special needs. Part of what really works for her is to have a written schedule for the week and also one for each day. Nothing set in stone, just a gentle flow of what is or should I say, should be expected each day. Her sensory processing disorder ( SPD) can make transitions anxiety producing, so seeing what is scheduled helps with that.

Our schedule was to include work time each day, yoga one morning a week, our walk, cooking on Monday, time to work on her Etsy account each morning and then whatever activity she has in the afternoon, as she has a few virtual therapies.

So, how is it going?

Well…?

I found out that we need to walk first thing in the morning. It takes us about and hour or so to do the 5 miles along with the getting ready and getting home part. So that is a big hunk of time. And if not done then, she either doesn’t feel like it or there isn’t time later. The walk is so calming and quite enjoyable, so we are making it a priority for her.

Then she eats breakfast and starts to relax which is a good thing but also makes transitioning to our Etsy or worktime a big push. And just maybe we haven’t done work this past week…..

I found out that cooking everyone Monday with her is fun as long as Michael doesn’t have basketball practice and I need to take him. If so, then I need to cook earlier in the day and at that time, she is on a virtual class…..so just maybe we need to be more flexible and pick A day, not necessarily Monday.

I learned that I make a very uncreative teacher. If the assignment says type this. I say “Elizabeth, let’s type this” to which she says a whole bunch of things, some positive others not so much. (These assignments come from her tutor.) I learned I need to review the work we need to do ahead of time to present it in manageable chunks.

I learned that putting anything on the schedule past 6pm is basically making the decision NEVER TO DO IT. Yep, I learned that one well. Who knew that that lovely open time of the day was a really bad time for Elizabeth? I thought with her being off, she would be less tired and ready to roll and we could space out the things we want to do. So it is a definite no-go at that time, and trust me, I got the message.

I also learned that working in her room is not ideal, as is working at the den table. It is oddly, the kitchen table that is the unique fit. Not too loud, not too quiet. So again, it is learning where your child will focus best and you will find us at the kitchen table moving forward.

As I said, we are in week two and made a few adjustments from last week and I think it is a bit better than last week, not all the way, just better. I think that by understanding that this whole thing is new to us all, we can allow ourselves the wiggle room to adjust and adjust until things settle in the best way for our child.

I also learned I need to pick up a few supplies for her learning as in I am not sure who took all the pencil grips?! So I will be taking an inventory of what we need. So it you find you need something, maybe take a look at our site to see what fits your needs.

I am writing this at 5:50 in the morning as I love to get up early and workout and get somethings done, I am watching the weather and it is 44 degrees outside, and I am thinking our walk is going to be a cold one today and I also know we will be walking early because I learned it is what works best for the flow of our day.

After all, it is all a learning process for us with our special needs children and they and we are all a work in progress.

I hope everyone has a peaceful week. Please wear a mask! I do for my mom and others who could get really ill

Michele Gianetti

Handwriting… All kids can find this difficult to master but special needs kids have a greater chance to experience the tears of frustration at school or at home while trying to get their homework done. The reason for this varies: either the body is not well positioned, the child lacks attention or coordination, there is a medical condition, you name it. Thankfully, there are exciting ways to promote handwriting skills that will work with almost every child!

5 tips handwriting

1. Grasp, grasp, grasp

Handwriting starts with good positioning of the whole body and fingers on the writing tool. It may be too abstract for your child to follow your directions as you explain or show them, so think of those pencil grips or claws to physically guide their hand. Heavy pens are another affordable and efficient way to improve their grasp by building hand muscles strength.

jumbo grip 1 claw medium 1 TPG-651

2. Lower the pressure

32090_3Handwriting problems often come from a too strong pressure applied by the child to the pen. Use stress balls at any time to encourage your child to relax their hand muscles and promote fine motor skills.

3. Feel the vibes

__017877_A_previewThe Squiggle Wiggle is a very original pen that vibrates, creating colored squiggles as an interesting alternative to drawing. It encourages fine motor control and helps your child appreciate writing while staying creative.

4. Have fun!

Think of fun activities that involve writing or drawing such as: drawing around your hand, making an herbarium (simply run a color pencil on a paper to transfer leaves’ relief), or playing Pictionary with the whole family! They should improve your child’s handwriting skills without tears.

iStock_000013308707_Large Herbarium Pictionary

5. Play (yes, play!)

TPG-654 OpenLet kids play their favorite game on a phone or tablet with an adapted stylus. They look just like a pen and will train them as if it were the real thing… except they are playing!

If those simple tips are still not effective enough, don’t hesitate to ask the help of an Occupational Therapist who will have a better understanding of your child’s abilities.

Did you find new tips to try with your child in this article? If you have more tips, please share with other readers!

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